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THE REDESIGN ALLIANCE

AGENDA
ANNUAL CONFERENCE
THE ROSEN CENTRE
ORLANDO , FLORIDA
March 18 - 20, 2007

Sunday, March 18
   
  4:00 – 5:00 pm Orientation for those new to course redesign
   
Monday, March 19
   
  7:30 – 8:30 am Continental Breakfast
   

  8:30 – 9:30 am

Opening Keynote: Carol A. Twigg
State-of-the-Art Course Redesign: What We’ve Achieved and Where We Need To Go
   
  9:30 – 10:00 am           Break
   

10:00 – 11:00 am

Disciplinary Showcase Sessions in Humanities; Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Science; Natural Sciences; and, Social Sciences

   
Session Type: Showcase session - a moderator introduces three speakers from different institutions/organizations who make separate 10-minute presentations. The moderator invites questions from the audience.
   
Description:

The purpose of these sessions is to enable participants to learn about three successful course redesigns so that those new to course redesign will be inspired to begin and those experienced in course redesign can learn from their colleagues. The goal is to achieve a 50/50 split between presentation and interaction with the audience.

   
Speakers:

Humanities

Quantitative

Natural Sciences

Social Sciences

   
11am – 12:00 pm

Disciplinary Roundtable Discussion Sessions in Humanities; Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Sciences; Natural Sciences; and, Social Sciences

Slides:

Quantitative

   
Session Type:

Roundtable discussion session - one or two individuals act as the moderator(s). They give a brief introduction to the topic and then facilitate a discussion among the audience members.

   
Description: The purpose of this session is to allow participants more time for in-depth discussion of the issues and challenges related to course redesign in general and the disciplines in particular. Moderators will be prepared to lead the discussions by focusing on a series of topics that reflect those issues and challenges.
   
12:00 – 1:30 pm Lunch
   
  1:30 – 2:30 pm Eight Great Ideas: Successful Redesign Techniques
   
Session Type:

Inspirational session - a moderator introduces two to three speakers from different institutions/organizations who make separate 10-minute presentations to stimulate discussion and new ways of thinking.

   
General Description:

The purpose of these sessions is to enable participants to learn about innovative course redesign techniques that concretely address a particular academic and/or resource problem. The goal is to achieve a 50/50 split between presentation and interaction with the audience.

   

Topics and Session Descriptions

1. Creating "Small" within "Large"

Description: One of the key characteristics of many course redesign projects is larger class size leading to reduced cost. Some begin with large lecture sections and retain those large sizes in the redesign; others reduce the number of sections offered and create larger classes; and, still others combine all sections into one large section. Yet these projects also increase student learning. Learn how to create “small” within “large” by using techniques such as peer learning teams and small learning communities that lead to greater student success.

Presenters: Noah Finkelstein, University of Colorado Boulder; Malcolm Hill, University of Richmond; Phil Turner, University of North Texas. Moderator: Ron Henry, Georgia State University.

2. Effective Use of Undergraduate Learning Assistants

Description: Using undergraduates as peer tutors or learning assistants can radically increase the amount of personalized assistance available to students and do so cost effectively. When properly trained, undergraduates have turned out to be better at assisting their peers than graduate students because of their better understanding of students' misconceptions and their superior communication skills. Learn how to make effective use of undergraduates in your course redesign.

Presenters: John Harwood, Penn State University; Ray Purdom, University of North Carolina — Greensboro; Kirk Trigsted, University of Idaho. Moderator: Carol Twigg, NCAT.

3. New Instructional Roles

Description: Are highly trained faculty members needed to conduct all tasks associated with delivering a course? By constructing an instructional support system that comprises various kinds of personnel, institutions can apply the right level of human intervention to particula kinds of student problems. Large-scale course redesigns have created new kinds of positions such as course assistants, preceptors and course coordinators that have specific roles within the course, leaving faculty free to concentrate on those tasks that require their level of expertise. Learn how to re-think faculty roles within large courses from those who have developed innovative approaches to staffing.

Presenters: Scott Karakas, Florida Gulf Coast University; Karen Mills, Rio Salado College; Burck Smith, SMARTHINKING. Moderator: Anne Moore, Virginia Tech.

4. Freshmen Don’t Do Optional

Description: Course redesign always succeeds when we engage students in doing the coursework, yet typically 30% or so may fail to participate in scheduled learning activities. Some institutions have been more successful than others in addressing the issue of “non-participating” students. Learn how to ensure that students spend sufficient time on task by using techniques such as scaffolding, mastery quizzing and giving points for participation that lead to greater course completion rates.

Presenters: Joe Benson, University of Alabama; Gordon Hodge, University of New Mexico; Jim Wohlpart, Florida Gulf Coast University. Moderator: Robbie Melton, Tennessee Board of Regents.

5. Modularization: Greater Flexibility Means Increased Learning Efficiency

Description: Many students get to the end of a course having mastered a large percentage of the material but not enough to pass the course. They are then forced to repeat the entire course. Others are required to take a developmental course because of low placement scores when they only lack a small part of the course content. Course modularization offers institutions a way to accommodate “partial” learning by letting students study only what they don’t know and make more rapid progress. Learn about different ways to modularize your course and what implementation issues need to be considered in advance.

Presenters: Houston Davis, Tennessee Board of Regents; Randy Smith, Ohio State University; Greg Tobin, Pearson Education. Moderator: Candace Thille, Carnegie Mellon University.

6. Avoiding “Either/Or” Choices

Description: We know that students bring different backgrounds, interests and abilities to college courses, yet what do we offer them most of the time? A fixed meal! The meals may be different from course to course—some may be lecture-based, others may be fully online—but most courses employ single strategies. Learn how to offer students a buffet of learning opportunities or a menu of choices that offer different paths to achieve the same learning outcomes.

Presenters: Dennis Pearl, Ohio State University; Donna Seagle, Chattanooga State and Technical College; Sally Search, Tallahassee Community College. Moderator: Tristan Denley

7. Student Readiness for Course Redesign

Description: Making the change from traditional classroom instruction to new ways of learning involves far more than learning to use a computer. Many students are set in their ways after a lifetime (albeit brief) of passive instruction. They need preparation in making the transition to more active learning environments. Learner readiness involves not only access to computers and to the network but also access to technical and other forms of student support (e.g., help in using navigation tools, course management systems, etc.) Learn about different approaches to ensuring that students acquire the skills and attitudes that are required in order to be successful in technology-intensive courses.

Presenters: Steve Acker, Ohio State University; Becca Morgan, Wayne State University; Randy Upchurch, University of Central Florida. Moderator: Elizabeth Connor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

8. Working with Commercial Software

Description: Incorporating commercial software and other technology-based curricular materials can give faculty a "head start" in the redesign process by enabling them to focus on redesign issues rather than on materials creation. Working with commercial publishers can be challenging and rewarding—challenging because the current state of the market is far from perfect and rewarding because the amount and quality of instructional software is improving every year. Learn from those who have used commercial software in their course redesigns, both the promises and the pitfalls, and how you can build on their success.

Presenters: Bob Olin, University of Alabama; Phoebe Rouse, Louisiana State University; Rob Sanders, Portland State University. Moderator: Carolyn Jarmon, NCAT.

  2:30 – 3:00 pm Break
   
  3:00 – 4:00 pm

Eight Great Ideas: Successful Redesign Techniques
Sessions will be repeated so that attendees may participate in a second session.

   
  4:00 – 5:00 pm Plenary Panel
Building an Assessment Culture
   
Session Type:

Plenary panel session - a moderator introduces two or three speakers who each make a single 10 – 15 minute presentation on the same topic, representing different experiences or points of view.

   
General Description: Plenary panels take as their theme one of the Alliance’s eight areas of work: Pedagogy, Resources, Assessment, Underserved Students, Technologies, Learning Materials, Learning Space Design and Change. The panel will focus on the relationship of higher education’s “big” issues to ways in which course redesign can address them.
   
Specific Description:

Higher education is well aware of the demands for greater accountability coming from policy makers, accreditation associations, the Spellings Commission, and so on. Most often, this takes the form of improving how well we assess student learning outcomes and reporting those assessments to multiple publics. Student learning can be assessed at the degree level, the program level and the course level, but how do these different levels fit together? This panel will discuss the “whys” and “hows” of the current emphasis on assessment and where assessment of student learning in redesigned courses fits in the big picture.

   
Panelists:

Steven Crow, The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools; Peter Ewell, National Center for Higher Education Management Systems; Mari Pearlman, Educational Testing Service; Moderator: Carol Twigg, NCAT.

   
  5:30 – 7:30 pm Reception
   
  7:30 - 8:30 pm

Use and Reuse of Materials
Candace Thille, Carnegie Mellon University

   
Tuesday, March 20
   
  7:30 – 8:30 am Continental Breakfast
   
  8:30 – 9:30 am Hot Topics in Course Redesign
   
Session Type:

Inspirational session - a moderator introduces two to three speakers from different institutions/organizations who make separate 10-minute presentations to stimulate discussion and new ways of thinking.

   
General Description:

The purpose of these sessions is to enable participants to learn about innovative approaches to each topic and have an opportunity to exchange ideas. The goal is to achieve a 50/50 split between presentation and interaction with the audience.

   

Topics and Session Descriptions

1. Feedback Forum

Description: The purpose of the Feedback Forum is to create an opportunity for those who have an idea of what they would like to do in a new course redesign and would like to get feedback on the idea from those who have done it. We anticipate that the Redesign Scholars will moderate the session and, together with the audience, offer feedback. We will require attendees to pre-register for this session in order to organize it appropriately. We anticipate, at a minimum, that the 20 institutional teams selected to participate in Round I of the Colleagues Committed to Redesign (C2R) program will take advantage of this session.

Moderators: Malcolm Hill, University of Richmond (Natural Sciences); Gordon Hodge, University of New Mexico (Social Sciences); Phoebe Rouse, Louisiana State University (Quantitative); Jim Wohlpart, Florida Gulf Coast University (Humanities).

2. So You Want To Do a Course Redesign? How To Get Started

Description: Course redesign sounds like a great idea—improving learning while reducing costs—who wouldn’t want to do that? But how do we get started? What do we do first? Among other things, this session will discuss what it means to be “ready,” initial data collection, generating buy-in, getting the right people on the redesign team and linking the redesign effort to larger institutional initiatives. Learn what to do first and why from those who have been through the experience and get your questions answered.

Presenters: Elizabeth Connor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Mary Jane Pasky, Lorain County Community College; Phil Turner, University of North Texas. Moderator: Ron Henry, Georgia State University.

3. Using Assessment to Achieve Other Goals

Description: Course redesign requires assessing student learning in both traditional and redesigned formats to “prove” that the new way is superior to the old. As such, assessment is a powerful instrument for change. Disagreements among faculty about the “best” way to teach can often be resolved by collecting data about the “best” way to learn. Because the state-of-the-art in campus assessment is relatively weak, assessments used in course redesign can provide an entre to generating interest among faculty and administrators in assessment in general. Learn from those who have conducted an original assessment of learning outcomes in one course have seen how that can be parleyed into achieving other institutional goals.

Presenters: Peter Ewell, National Center for Higher Education Management Systems; Randy Smith, Ohio State University; Candace Thille, Carnegie Mellon University. Moderator: Anne Moore, Virginia Tech.

4. Redesigning Developmental and Remedial Education

Description: A recent NCES study revealed that 28% of entering freshmen in 2000 were enrolled in one or more remedial reading, writing, or mathematics courses. At public two-year institutions, 42% of freshmen enroll in these courses; at public four-year institutions, 20% enroll. Can course redesign using technology in developmental and remedial courses increase student success and reduce the inordinate amount of time and expense required of students who participate in such courses? Learn from those who have redesigned these courses what works and what does not and add your thoughts and ideas to the discussion.

Presenters: Becca Morgan, Wayne State University; Sally Search, Tallahassee Community College; Kirk Trigsted, University of Idaho. Moderator: Treva Berryman, Tennessee Board of Regents.

5. Getting Faculty On Board

Description: Faculty support for and participation in course redesign initiatives are crucial to achieving a successful outcome. But frequently administrators may need to generate that support or pioneering faculty may need to win over their colleagues to try something new. How do you overcome resistance to change? How do you deal with differences of opinion about the “best” way to teach? How do you achieve consensus on what the redesign should look like and what it should accomplish? Learn from those who have grappled with these challenges successfully to complete a large-scale course redesign and bring your tough questions for an exchange of ideas.

Presenters: Bob Henshaw, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Linda Morris, University of Idaho; Bob Olin, University of Alabama. Moderator: Karen Wells, Lorain County Community College.

6. Increasing Success for Underserved Students

Description: What has been the impact of course redesign on underserved students—students of color, low-income students, first-generation college students and working adults? Does course redesign work as well, better than or less than with them as with more traditional students? Do institutions have to take things like technology anxiety and/or access into account when thinking about redesign for underserved students? Learn about what works and what doesn’t work with this target population and contribute your thoughts and experiences to the discussion.

Presenters: Joe Benson, University of Alabama; John Broida, University of Southern Maine; Karen Mills, Rio Salado College. Moderator: Burck Smith, SMARTHINKING.

7. Better Retention through Course Redesign

Description: Course redesign has reduced drop-failure-withdrawal (DFW) rates and increased successful course completion, leading to overall increases in student retention. Learn from three institutions with great track records how they have increased student success and how you replicate what they have done on your own campus.

Presenters: Dennis Pearl, Ohio State University; Ray Purdom, University of North Carolina – Greensboro; Amiee Wagner, Central Ohio Technical College. Moderator: John Harwood, Penn State University.

8. Responding to High Enrollment Demand

Description: Are some courses at your institution experiencing greater demand than you can meet with current resources? Do over-enrolled courses increase faculty workload? Are students unable to enroll in certain courses when it fits their schedules, creating “academic bottlenecks” that impede progress to graduation? Is overall enrollment demand at your institution growing but without commensurate growth in resources? Course redesign offers many solutions to these challenges. Learn from those who have increased student enrollments without increasing faculty workload what strategies worked best for them.

Presenters: Ben Hambleton, Boise State University; Rob Sanders, Portland State University; Margaret Trim, Central Ohio Technical College. Moderator: Pam Quinn, Dallas County Community College District.

  9:30 – 10:00 am Break
   
10:00 – 11:00 am

Hot Topics in Course Redesign
Sessions will be repeated so that attendees may participate in a second session.

   
11:00 am – 12:00 pm Plenary Panel
Change Strategies: Moving Beyond the First Redesign
   
Session Type:

Plenary panel session - a moderator introduces two or three speakers who each make a single 10 – 15 minute presentation on the same topic, representing different experiences or points of view.

   
General Description: Plenary panels take as their theme one of the Alliance’s eight areas of work: Pedagogy, Resources, Assessment, Underserved Students, Technologies, Learning Materials, Learning Space Design and Change. The panel will focus on the relationship of higher education’s “big” issues to ways in which course redesign can address them.
   
Specific Description:

Course redesign that improves learning while reducing costs has tremendous promise for making substantial change in the ways that all of us in higher education teach and learn. But one course is just a good start. How do we sustain what we’ve started? How do we scale what we learn in one course redesign beyond that one course? How do we have an impact on other courses within the department? On other departments? On the entire institution?

   
Panelists: Malcolm Hill, University of Richmond; Bob Olin, University of Alabama; Nancy Shapiro, University System of Maryland; Moderator: Carolyn Jarmon, NCAT.
   
 12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch