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THE REDESIGN ALLIANCE

AGENDA
THE REDESIGN ALLIANCE THIRD ANNUAL CONFERENCE
THE ROSEN CENTRE
ORLANDO , FLORIDA
March 22 - 24, 2009

NOTE: Presentation slides are linked to the presenters' names.
Descriptions of the redesign projects are linked to the presenters' institutions.
Slides from the Sunday sessions are linked to the session titles.

Sunday, March 22
   
  1:00 – 3:00 pm C2R Round III Orientation (by invitation)
   
  An orientation for those selected to participate in Round III of NCAT's Colleagues Committed to Redesign (C2R) program.
   
  3:00 – 4:00 pm

C2R Round II Debriefing Session (by invitation)

   
  A meeting of Round II participants in NCAT’s Colleagues Committed to Redesign (C2R) program.
   
  4:00 – 5:30 pm Orientation for those new to course redesign
   
  An orientation for conference participants who are new to course redesign. Learn how to make the most of your conference experience.
   
  5:30 – 7:30 pm Opening Reception and Corporate Exhibits
   
  Join your fellow conference participants for an opening reception in the Corporate Exhibit hall. Learn about products and services provided by the corporate members of the Redesign Alliance: Blackboard; Cengage Learning; Hawkes Learning Systems; McGraw-Hill Higher Education; Pearson Education; SMARTHINKING; and, WebAssign.
   
   
Monday, March 23
   
  7:15 – 8:30 am Breakfast
   

  8:30 – 9:30 am

Opening Keynote: Philip J. Parsons, Director, Sasaki Strategies.
Learning Space Design: Changing the Environments in Which We Teach and Learn  

We know that space can affect the character and quality of learning, whether cyberspace or physical space, and with capital budgets shrinking, achieving the maximum learning per square foot becomes critical. In his keynote address, Philip Parsons, who has consulted on learning environments in over sixty colleges and universities, will look at the relationship between space and learning in higher education and will consider ways in which we can maximize the effectiveness of the full range of potential learning spaces on and off the campus. We will look at hybrid spaces serving multiple purposes, intentional and unintentional interaction spaces, classrooms that work and classrooms that don't, the current revitalization of libraries, and the whole backdrop of settings, including the sacrosanct faculty office, in which the "social life of information," as John Seely Brown calls it, is played out. With some campuses having three times the space per student that they had in the early seventies, the meta-message of today's campuses as learning communities requires examination, as does their cost-effectiveness. How can we do better in tight times?

   
  9:30 – 10:00 am           Break
   

10:00 – 12:00 am

Disciplinary Showcase Sessions in Developmental Studies, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences

   
Session Type:

Showcase session - a moderator introduces three speakers from different institutions/organizations each of whom makes a separate presentation. The moderator invites questions from the audience.

   
Description:

The purpose of these sessions is to enable participants to learn about three successfully completed course redesigns. Those new to course redesign will be inspired to begin and those experienced in course redesign can learn from their colleagues and contribute to the discussion. The goal is to achieve a 50/50 split between presentation and interaction with the audience.

NOTE: Each presenter has fully implemented a course redesign and will provide comparative data on student learning outcomes and instructional costs in the traditional and redesigned formats. To read an abstract of each presenter’s redesign project, click on the presenter’s institution.

   
   
  Humanities
 

Presenters: Meg McConnaughy, Arizona State University (Public Speaking); Sally Search, Tallahassee Community College (English Composition); Jim Wohlpart, Florida Gulf Coast University, (Understanding the Visual and Performing Arts). Moderator: Jim Wohlpart, Florida Gulf Coast University.

   
  Social Sciences
 

Presenters: Megan Bradley, Frostburg State University (Psychology); John Broida, University of Southern Maine (Psychology); Michelle Miller, Northern Arizona University. Moderator: Michelle Miller, Northern Arizona University.

   
  Developmental Mathematics
 

Presenters: Betty Frost, Jackson State Community College; Martin Golson, Austin Peay State University; Karen Wyrick, Cleveland State Community College. Moderator: Mary Jane Pasky, Lorain County Community College.

   
  College-Level Mathematics I
 

Presenters: Joe Benson, University of Alabama; Tristan Denley, Austin Peay State University; Phoebe Rouse, Louisiana State University. Moderator: Tristan Denley, Austin Peay State University.

   
  College-Level Mathematics II
 

Presenters: Shahla Peterman, University of Missouri-Saint Louis; Kirk Trigsted, University of Idaho; Mike Williams, Virginia Tech. Moderator: Kirk Trigsted, University of Idaho.

   
  Natural Sciences
 

Presenters: Janet Bond-Robinson, Arizona State University (Chemistry); Elizabeth Connor, University of Massachusetts Amherst (Biology); Amiee Wagner, Central Ohio Technical College (Anatomy and Physiology). Moderator: Ron Henry, Georgia State University.

   
 

Quantitative: Statistics and Computing

 

Presenters: Toni Farley, Arizona State University (Computing); John Harwood, Penn State University (Statistics); Dennis Pearl, Ohio State University, (Statistics). Moderator : Dennis Pearl, Ohio State University.

   
12:00 – 1:30 pm Lunch
   
 

A portion of the lunch tables will be set aside to facilitate Birds of a Feather sessions. (See registration information.)

   
  1:30 – 3:45 pm Disciplinary Roundtable Discussion Sessions in Business, Developmental Studies, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences
   
Session Type:

Roundtable discussion session – a moderator gives a brief introduction to the topic and then facilitates a discussion among the audience members.

   
Description:

The purpose of these sessions is to allow participants more time for in-depth discussion of the issues and challenges related to course redesign in general and the disciplines in particular. Presentations from three or four course redesign projects in each disciplinary cluster which are in the midst of their pilot implementations will serve as case studies to illustrate those issues and challenges. NCAT Redesign Scholars will serve as moderators.

To read an abstract of each presenter’s redesign project, click on the presenter’s institution.

   
  Developmental Math
 

Case Studies: Tor Kwembe, Jackson State University; Rebecca Muller, Southeastern Louisiana State University; Barry Piazza, University of Southern Mississippi. Moderators: Kirk Trigsted, University of Idaho, and Mary Jane Pasky, Lorain County Community College.

   
  College-Level Math
 

Case Studies: Marchetta Atkins, Alcorn State University; Dale Alspach, Oklahoma State University; Pat Pacitti, SUNY at Oswego. Moderators: Tristan Denley, Austin Peay State University, and Phoebe Rouse, Louisiana State University

   
  Quantitative Courses (Other Than Math)
  Case Studies: Marie-Anne Demuynck, Texas Woman's University (Computing and Developmental Math); Nancy Howell, University of Southern Mississippi (Computing); Sal Sciandra, Niagara County Community College (Statistics). Moderators: Dennis Pearl, Ohio State University, and Ron Henry, Georgia State University.
   
  Humanities and Writing-Intensive Courses
 

Case Studies: Jim German, SUNY Potsdam (History); Greg Jones, University of West Alabama (English Composition); Michael Mays, University of Southern Mississippi (Technical Writing); Carmen Rivera, SUNY Fredonia (Spanish). Moderators: Sally Search, Tallahassee Community College, and Jim Wohlpart, Florida Gulf Coast University.

   
  Social Sciences
 

Case Studies: David Echevarria, University of Southern Mississippi (Psychology); Bill Ganley, Buffalo State College (Economics); Dina Karafantis, New York Institute of Technology (Psychology). Moderators: Gordon Hodge, University of New Mexico, and John Broida, University of Southern Maine.

   
  Natural Sciences
 

Case Studies: David Barnes, SUNY Canton (Biology), Steven Holman, Mississippi State University (Chemistry); Mary Celeste Reese, Mississippi State University (Biology); Marllin Simon, Auburn University (Physics). Moderators: Elizabeth Connor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Amiee Wagner, Central Ohio Technical College.

   
   
 

Roundtable Discussion for Administrators

   
 

Description: The purpose of this session is to allow participants time for in-depth discussion of the issues and challenges related to course redesign in general and the role of administrators in particular. Moderators will be prepared to lead the discussions by focusing on a series of topics that reflect those issues and challenges. Moderators: Carol Twigg and Carolyn Jarmon, NCAT.

  4:00 – 5:00 pm

Plenary Panel
Learning Space Design: Changing the Environments in Which We Teach and Learn

   
Session Type: Plenary panel session - a moderator introduces two or three speakers who each make a single 10 – 15 minute presentation on the same topic, representing different experiences or points of view.
   
Description:

Plenary panels take as their theme one of the Alliance’s eight areas of work: Pedagogy, Resources, Assessment, Underserved Students, Technologies, Learning Materials, Learning Space Design and Change.

   
Specific Description:

Course redesign that improves learning while reducing costs can require substantial changes in campus facilities since traditional classrooms may or may not be suited to new ways of offering courses. How can we help institutions connect space planning and effective learning? How do we scale what we learn in one course redesign beyond that one course? This panel of redesign project leaders will discuss the impact of their redesigns on campus space, how they developed support for the needed changes and how new spaces are serving the learning needs of their students.

Panelists: Janet Bond-Robinson, Arizona State University; Elizabeth Connor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Joel Hartman, University of Central Florida. Moderator: Carolyn Jarmon, NCAT.

   
  5:15 – 6:30 pm Poster Sessions (Descriptions)
   
Description:

Poster sessions highlight the innovative ways institutions are approaching course redesign. Poster displays feature new projects or programs and allow one-on-one discussion between attendees and presenters, creating an informal opportunity to share ideas.

   
  5:30 – 7:30 pm Poolside Reception
   
Tuesday, March 24
   
  7:15 – 8:30 am Breakfast
   
  8:30 – 9:30 am Hot Topics in Course Redesign
   
Session Type: Inspirational session - a moderator introduces two to three speakers from different institutions/organizations who make separate 10-minute presentations to stimulate discussion and new ways of thinking.
   
General Description:

The purpose of these sessions is to enable participants to learn about innovative approaches to each topic and have an opportunity to exchange ideas. The goal is to achieve a 50/50 split between presentation and interaction with the audience.

To read an abstract of each presenter’s redesign project, click on the presenter’s institution.

Topics and Session Descriptions

Applying the Six Models for Course Redesign in New Ways (8:30 am – 9:30 am only)

Description: Based on nine years of experience in working with a large number of colleges and universities as they seek to improve student learning while reducing instructional costs, NCAT has identified Six Models for Course Redesign. We have learned that certain models seem to be appropriate to certain disciplines. For example, foreign language projects select the Replacement Model; math projects select the Emporium Model. The nature of the discipline informs the choice of model. We are now beginning to see variations on previous redesigns in different disciplines and the emergence of a sixth model. Learn about the strengths and weaknesses of particular models for particular disciplines as well as new ways to apply them.

Presenters : Denise Brown, University of Southern Mississippi (Nutrition); Martin Golson, Austin Peay State University (Developmental Mathematics); Anthony Vizzini, Mississippi State University (Statics). Moderator: Carolyn Jarmon, NCAT.

Redesigning Developmental English (9:45 am – 10:45 am only)

Description: Many in higher education believe that technology and developmental English courses are like oil and water. That view is starting to change as course redesign has begun to show how using technology in the context of learner-centered principles can be a valuable tool in improving student success in these threshold courses. Learn from others what works and what does not in both reading and writing courses at the developmental level.

Presenters: Leslie Jones, University of Texas at Brownsville/Texas Southmost College; Doug Wilson, Richland College. Moderator: Jon Alexiou, Educational Testing Service.

How-To Session: Effective Use of Undergraduate Learning Assistants

Description: Using undergraduates as peer tutors or learning assistants can radically increase the amount of personalized assistance available to students and do so cost effectively. When properly trained, undergraduates have turned out to be better at assisting their peers than graduate students because of their better understanding of students' misconceptions and their superior communication skills. Learn new ways to make effective use of undergraduates in your course redesign.

Presenters: Megan Bradley, Frostburg State University; Bill Ganley, Buffalo State College; Meg McConnaughy, Arizona State University. Moderator: Phil Turner, University of North Texas.

Engaging Students in New Ways of Learning

Description: Course redesign always succeeds when we engage students in doing the coursework, yet typically 30% or so may fail to participate in scheduled learning activities. Some institutions have been more successful than others in addressing the issue of “non-participating” students. Learn how to ensure that students spend sufficient time on task by using techniques such as scaffolding, mastery quizzing and giving points for participation that lead to greater course completion rates. Learn how techniques such as peer learning teams and small learning communities can lead to greater student success.

Presenters: Elizabeth Connor, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Candace Thille, Carnegie Mellon University; Kirk Trigsted, University of Idaho. Moderator: Randy Smith, Ohio State University.

Working with Commercial Software

Description: Incorporating commercial software and other technology-based curricular materials can give faculty a "head start" in the redesign process by enabling them to focus on redesign issues rather than on materials creation. Working with commercial publishers and technology companies can be rewarding because the amount and quality of instructional software is improving every year. Learn from four of higher education’s major partners how their products can be used in course redesign and how you can build on the successes that others have achieved.

Session I

Using Blackboard for Successful Redesign
8:30 am – 9:30 am only

Description: Throughout the NCAT redesign process, the effective use of instructional technology is critical to course and institutional success. Many institutions have chosen Blackboard, with its wide range of partner technologies and publisher-integrated resources, to support effective course redesign. This presentation focuses on effective practices for using Blackboard for course collaboration and assessing and promoting learner success. Session attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions and engage in an open dialogue about how best to utilize Blackboard solutions to further their own redesign projects.

Presenters: John Broida, University of Southern Maine and Michelle Miller, Northern Arizona University. Moderator: Deborah Everhart, Blackboard.

Rethinking Math and Chemistry Gateway Courses with McGraw-Hill's Digital Solutions
9:45 am – 10:45 am only

Description: At virtually every higher education institution, gateway mathematics and chemistry courses are plagued by poor student retention and high failure rates. These chronic student achievement problems too often mushroom into real obstacles to students’ ultimate academic success, and even graduation. Join us for a panel discussion featuring mathematics and chemistry faculty from three higher education institutions who are deploying McGraw-Hill’s digital solutions. Learn how these institutions are breaking new ground in gateway course redesign and more.

Presenters: Alison Ahlgren, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Mathematics); Gary Kinsel, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (Chemistry); and R.E. Moore, Missouri Western State University (Mathematics.) Moderator: Ryan Blankenship, McGraw-Hill Higher Education.

Session II

Improving Student Learning: Faculty Experiences with Pearson's Mastering Chemistry and MyReadingLab
8:30 am – 9:30 am only: Pearson Education

Description: Join us to hear from two faculty members who are finding success with Pearson’s advanced MyLabs, Mastering and eCollege™ learning system and services. The presenters will relate how their use of the software’s features (including diagnostic testing and remediation, student support, and faculty services) contributed to improving student learning while controlling instructional costs. Tracking, measurement, reporting, and analysis are critical tools for students, faculty, and all curriculum programs, and these will be discussed as well.

Presenters: David Deardon, Brigham Young University (Chemistry) and Xiaoping Wang, Northeast State Technical Community College (Reading). Moderators: Greg Tobin and Mary Ann Perry, Pearson Education.

Engaging Students and Driving Results: Redesigning Chemistry and Nutrition Using Cengage Learning’s Course360
9:45 am – 10:45 am only

Description: Auburn University and the University of Southern Mississippi have both embraced course redesign in their physics and nutrition and food systems departments. Learn what they are doing to improve student learning and reduce instructional costs and the role of Cengage Learning’s Course360 custom courseware product in each redesign. Presenters will discuss the specific pedagogical approaches they use with the software (what instructors do and what the software does) and how well the two fit together.

Presenters: Marllin Simon, Auburn University (Physics) and Denise Brown, University of Southern Mississippi (Nutrition and Food Systems). Moderator: Dreis Van Landuyt, Cengage Learning.

How-To Session: Developing a Valid Assessment Plan

Description: Course redesign requires assessing student learning in both traditional and redesigned formats to “prove” that the new way is superior to the old. As such, assessment is a powerful instrument for change. Disagreements among faculty about the “best” way to teach can often be resolved by collecting data about the “best” way to learn. But that data must be both valid and reliable—i.e., comparing grades is not sufficient. Learn from those who have done it how to create a valid assessment plan and how to avoid potential pitfalls.

Presenters: Peter Ewell, Vice President, National Center for Higher Education Management Systems; Jim German, SUNY Potsdam; Dennis Pearl, Ohio State University. Moderator: Anne Moore, Virginia Tech.

It’s Not Your Father’s Online Course

Description: Most fully online courses continue to use individual faculty members to deliver multiple sections of the same course, each of which is relatively small in size. This model requires the instructor to be responsible for all interactions, answering every inquiry, comment or discussion personally. As a result, faculty members often spend more time teaching online and interacting with students than is the case in classroom teaching. This session will introduce a number of radically different models for fully online courses that are able to serve large numbers of students cost effectively. Learn how you can re-think the way you offer online courses by using NCAT’s principles of course redesign.

Presenters: Toni Farley, Arizona State University (Computer Literacy); Meredith Irvin, Arizona State University (Emergent Literacy); Jim Wohlpart, Florida Gulf Coast University, (Understanding the Visual and Performing Arts). Moderator: Carol Twigg, NCAT.

  9:30 – 9:45 am Break
   
  9:45 – 10:45 am

Hot Topics in Course Redesign
Most sessions will be repeated so that attendees may participate in a second session.

   
11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Plenary Panel
Pedagogical Best Practices: The Power of Quizzing

   
Session Type:

Plenary panel session - a moderator introduces two or three speakers who each make a single 10 – 15 minute presentation on the same topic, representing different experiences or points of view.

   
General Description: Plenary panels take as their theme one of the Alliance’s eight areas of work: Pedagogy, Resources, Assessment, Underserved Students, Technologies, Learning Materials, Learning Space Design and Change.
   
Specific Description:

Quizzing is an effective tool that compels students to review material. Used by many teachers, in a variety of disciplines, from the primary grades through graduate school, this tool is perhaps the most universally recognized way to get students to prepare for class. Quizzing also can sharply improve long-term retention of unfamiliar knowledge. Researchers have shown that quizzing, if done correctly, is a uniquely powerful method for implanting new learning in students' memory. This panel will discuss how quizzing can be an effective and efficient pedagogical tool when used appropriately and a major contributor to improved student learning.

Panelists: Gordon Hodge, University of New Mexico; Mark McDaniel, Washington University. Moderator: Carol Twigg, NCAT.

   
 12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch
   
 

A portion of the lunch tables will be set aside to facilitate Birds of a Feather sessions. (See registration information.)

   
  1:15 – 3:00 pm The Redesign Alliance Advisory Board meeting (by invitation)