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Monographs

The following monographs have been chosen to serve as a source of expertise and support for those in higher education who wish to take advantage of the capabilities of information technology to transform their academic practices.


Academic Productivity

Learning Productivity: A New Imperative for American Higher Education (1992)
By D. Bruce Johnstone
Advocates enhancing academic productivity by increasing higher education's output--mainly student learning--in a way that delivers the same or more educational quality but for less money.

The Need for a National Learning Infrastructure (1994)
By Carol A. Twigg
Discusses the need to create new ways of delivering higher education in response to changes in the way we define collegiate learning and to overcome the shortcomings of our one-size-fits-all approach to teaching.

Using Information Technology to Enhance Academic Productivity (1995)
By William F. Massy and Robert Zemsky
Discusses how the infusion of information technology into the educational process can reverse the declining productivity of American higher education.

Academic Productivity: The Case for Instructional Software (1996)
By Carol A. Twigg
Discusses why software-based, learner-centered alternatives to traditional instructional practices can have a significant impact on productivity in higher education.


Course Redesign

Improving Learning & Reducing Costs: Redesigning Large-Enrollment Courses (1999)
By Carol A. Twigg
Explores the theory and practice of redesigning learning environments using technology to enhance learning and reduce costs. The monograph includes case studies illustrating successful practices.

Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: Lessons Learned from Round I of the Pew Grant Program in Course Redesign (2001)
By Carol A. Twigg
Analyzes the results of the Round I projects, with a focus on the most important quality improvement and cost reduction techniques used in the redesigns, the implementation issues they encountered, and the projected sustainability of the course redesigns.

Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: Lessons Learned from Round II of the Pew Grant Program in Course Redesign (2002)
By Carol A. Twigg
Analyzes the results of the Round II projects, with a focus on the most important quality improvement and cost reduction techniques used in the redesigns, the implementation issues they encountered, and the projected sustainability of the course redesigns.

Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: Lessons Learned from Round III of the Pew Grant Program in Course Redesign (2003)
By Carol A. Twigg
Analyzes the results of the Round III projects, with a focus on the most important quality improvement and cost reduction techniques used in the redesigns, the implementation issues they encountered, and the projected sustainability of the course redesigns.

Increasing Success for Underserved Students: Redesigning Introductory Courses (2005)
By Carol A. Twigg
Examines the impact of the redesign techniques developed by the Program in Course Redesign on the success of adult students, students of color, and low-income students.

Improving Quality and Reducing Costs: The Case for Redesign (2005)
By Carol A. Twigg
Published by Lumina Foundation for Education as part of a series of constructive, innovative solutions to the problem of college costs that provide a range of options for policy makers.

Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: Project Outcomes and Lessons Learned from the Roadmap to Redesign (2006)
By Carol A. Twigg
Analyzes the results of the Roadmap to Redesign projects, with a focus on the most important quality improvement and cost reduction techniques used in the redesigns, the implementation issues they encountered, and the projected sustainability of the course redesigns.


Distributed Learning

The Virtual University (1997)
By Carol A. Twigg and Diana G. Oblinger
Explores what higher education might be like in the future and discusses how institutions can position themselves to participate successfully in that future.

Innovations in Online Learning: Moving Beyond No Significant Difference (2001)
By Carol A. Twigg
Through a series of case studies introduces new approaches to online teaching and learning that build on the strengths of the Internet in order to surpass traditional modes of instruction.

Quality Assurance for Whom? Providers and Consumers in Today's Distributed Learning Environment (2001)
By Carol A. Twigg
Explores the nature of the problem that distributed learning seems to present for traditional quality assurance practice both from the perspective of institutions and agencies and from the point of view of consumers, primarily students but also employers and graduate and professional schools.

Redefining Community: Small Colleges in the Information Age (2002)
By Carol A. Twigg
Explores the unique opportunities and challenges presented by information technology to small, residential liberal arts colleges and examines six new approaches being pioneered by peer institutions that are transferable to others.

Expanding Access to Learning: The Role of Virtual Universities (2003)
By Carol A. Twigg
Assesses the current state of statewide virtual university initiatives and offers an alternative strategy to the predominant collaborative model.


Online Learning Materials

Creating and Delivering Collegiate Learning Materials in a Distributed (Networked) Learning Environment: A Business Model for University-Corporate Collaboration (1997)
By Carol A. Twigg
Examines the four-phase process of creating learning materials and using them in credit-bearing courses: content assembly, marketing and distribution, inclusion in the academic program, and certification of the learning results and raises the question of how to create a new business model in a digital environment.

Who Owns Online Courses and Course Materials? Intellectual Property Policies for a New Learning Environment (2000)
By Carol A. Twigg
Explores policy questions associated with the production of online learning. Includes case studies illustrating the various dilemmas faced by institutions and establishes a conceptual framework to assist them in developing appropriate policies.


Public Policy

The NLII Vision: Implications for Systems and States (1997)
By Robert C. Heterick, Jr. and Carol A. Twigg
Focuses on the impact of IT developments on the way in which we regulate, organize and finance higher education in the United States, including the nature of the competitive environment brought about through digital networks, the variety of change strategies open to states and systems of higher education, and the kinds of financing policies that can lead to cost-effective delivery of higher education to future generations of students.

The Public Policy Implications of a Global Learning Infrastructure (1998)
By Robert C. Heterick, Jr., James R. Mingle, and Carol A. Twigg
Offers a vision of the challenges higher education will face in the next century and makes recommendations for information technology financing and investment strategies drawing from views of 25 state representatives, educators, and policy experts.